Mitsubishi Corporation

Intensive Mixed Planting of Native Tree Species

Intensive mixed plantings of native indigenous tree species creating thriving tropical forests

Plants live or die through their root systems, so the Miyawaki planting method begins with the cultivation of seedlings

In 1990, Dr. Miyawaki used his planting method in reforestation work in Malaysia, with outstanding results.

Due to rapid decomposition owing to high temperatures and humidity in equatorial zones, the topsoil of tropical forests is surprisingly infertile. Therefore, plants live or die on the strength of their roots. For this reason, the project began with the cultivation of seedlings as a way of ensuring that the young plants would have well-developed root systems.

Planting potted seedlings through the Miyawaki method
Planting potted seedlings through the Miyawaki method

The potted plants are allowed to acclimatize in a natural environment for between a week and a month

Since the germination potential of seeds begins to deteriorate about two weeks after they fall, they are immediately gathered and planted in seed beds.

When the germinated plants have produced two to six leaves, they are transplanted from the seed beds to pots.

When the plants are 30 to 50 centimeters tall and have root systems that fill the pots, the next stage is intensive, mixed planting at the rate of two to three plants per square meter. However, potted plants cannot be trans-planted immediately. In a tropical forest, each tree over 50 meters tall is surrounded by a throng of about 1,500 descendants. The plants need to become acclimatized in this natural environment, so the pots are set out in a suitable location, such as adjacent to the existing forest, for a period of between one and four weeks, depending on the species of tree and weather conditions at the time. They are then moved to the area to be reforested and are planted in a natural fashion.

Potted seedlings in the Amazon, Brazil
(1) Virola surinamensis
(1) Virola surinamensis
(2) Ceiba pentandra
(2) Ceiba pentandra
(3) Schizolobium amazonnicum
(3) Schizolobium amazonnicum
(4) Swietenia macrophylla
(4) Swietenia macrophylla
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